Your Kitchen Hood Is Not Working Properly

The purpose of an extractor hood is to suck up and filter the vapours produced by cooking, especially those containing large amounts of grease and fat, though also moisture and odours too. Over time, and with continued use, cooker hoods can sometimes stop working. Here we take a look at the various reasons why this might happen.

THE POTENTIAL CAUSES FOR THIS PROBLEM:

WARNING
Before you do anything to your appliance, make sure you disconnect it from the power supply.
There is a risk of electric shock.
Wear suitable protective gloves if you need to dismantle anything.
There is a risk of getting cut or injured.

There is an issue with the electricity supply to the appliance

There is an issue with the electricity supply to the appliance Though it's not the first thing you might immediately think of, it's possible that the issue is not with the cooker hood itself but instead with its electricity supply. We recommend you check the electric socket using a multimeter in voltmeter mode (AC). To do this, place the meter's two probes on the socket's live and neutral terminals. You should get a reading of 230 volts. You might also want to check to see if the socket has melted. It may have become fused together with the plug. If you have any terminal connectors fitted, check they're properly tightened and that the electric wires are in good condition.

The connector on the lead is not properly plugged in

The connector on the lead is not properly plugged in Some cooker hoods have an electric lead fitted with a connector that attaches to the appliance. The connector will be either a male or female plug. One possibility is that you did not properly and firmly plug the connector in when installing your cooker hood. With use, and as a result of the vibrations produced, a faulty contact can develop. We recommend you check that the connector is properly plugged in and that it's in good condition. If it's damaged, you will need to replace it.

The function selector mechanism is faulty

The function selector mechanism is faulty The function selector enables the cooker hood to be turned on and operated. If it's faulty, therefore, the hood will not be able to work at all. Selector mechanisms can be either mechanical switches or microswitch and circuit board based. You can check the selector mechanism's condition yourself. It will normally be located behind the control panel. If the function selector turns out to be the cause of the issue, it will most likely be due to the microswitches no longer making proper contact. If this is the case, you will need to replace the circuit.

The capacitor on the motor has failed

The capacitor on the motor has failed The capacitor serves to both start the fan motor and maintain its torque. If the capacitor fails, the motor will try to turn but will be unable to get started. You can easily test it yourself. To do this, first switch the extractor hood on. Then, when the motor tries to start, turn the impeller by hand to get it moving. If the motor then starts running, it's possible your capacitor is faulty. If this is the case, it will need to be replaced.

The impeller is not tightly screwed on

The impeller is not tightly screwed on The impeller is a small propeller-type component that serves to evacuate the air through the cooker hood. It is held in place on the motor spindle by a nut. Cooker hood impellers are usually made from plastic. Check to see if there is any foreign object jamming the impeller and that its bolt is securely tightened. Also check to see if it's broken anywhere. If it is, you'll need to replace it.

The extractor fan motor is jammed

The extractor fan motor is jammed If the filter or filters on your appliance are clogged up, the hood will not be able to function properly. Clogged filters prevent the air from passing through freely. This is especially the case with recirculating type extractor hoods. These kinds of hoods are fitted with a carbon filter that sits close to the motor. If this filter gets clogged up, which normally occurs due to grease build-up, this may result in the motor not working properly, which will result in the appliance not starting up. Carbon filters need to sometimes be cleaned, if this is possible (some can be washed). Where this is not possible, you will need to change the filter. This kind of issue is the primary cause of faults on recirculating type extractor hoods. The carbon filters in cooker hoods should be replaced once every three months. Also remember to regularly clean the grease filter in your extractor hood, no matter whether you have a ducted or a recirculating type one. This prevents the entire system (i.e. the suction, filtration and evacuation parts) getting blocked up.

Purchase a carbon filter for the extractor hood

The filters are clogged up

The filters are clogged up If the filter or filters on your appliance are clogged up, the hood might no longer be able to operate properly. Clogged filters prevent the air from passing through freely. This is especially the case with recirculating type extractor hoods. These kinds of hoods are fitted with a carbon filter that sits close to the motor. If this filter gets clogged up, which normally occurs due to grease build-up, this will prevent the motor from working properly and as a consequence the appliance will not be able to start up. Carbon filters need to sometimes be cleaned, if this is possible. Where this is not possible, you will need to replace the clogged filter. This kind of issue is the primary cause of faults on recirculating type extractor hoods. The carbon filters in cooker hoods should be replaced once every three months. Also remember to regularly clean the grease filter in your extractor hood, no matter whether you have a ducted or a recirculating type one. This prevents the entire system (i.e. the suction, filtration and evacuation parts) getting blocked up.

Purchase a carbon filter for the extractor hood

The main circuit board (PCB) is defective

The main circuit board PCB is defective The main circuit board (PCB) manages all your cooker hood's functions (motor, light, etc.). If you've already checked everything else and the problem still persists, it may be that the circuit board needs replacing. You can change this part yourself; it will be located either behind the control panel or in the section leading to the duct. Alternatively, you can call on the services of a manufacturer-approved engineer.

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