Your Microwave Is Tripping Breaker On Startup

CHas your microwave recently begun tripping the power in your house and you don't understand why? Here, we're going to help you work out where this problem is coming from so you can resolve it.

THE POTENTIAL CAUSES FOR THIS PROBLEM:

WARNING
We recommend adopting a very cautious and safety-conscious approach if you need to take your microwave apart at any point.
Microwave ovens produce powerful electrical discharges that can potentially be fatal.
Never test and use a multimeter on the appliance with it still plugged into the mains. The voltages on either the magnetron, transformer or capacitor may be too high for the multimeter to cope with.
Even when unplugged, the capacitor inside the microwave oven can still produce power electrical discharges.
We therefore recommend you leave the appliance to discharge for at least one day before taking it apart.
When you first open the microwave up, make sure you short circuit the capacitor using a pair of electrically insulated pliers (with the appliance unplugged from the mains of course).
We also recommend wearing a pair of electrically insulated gloves to ensure you are able to work in complete safety.
Carrying out repairs on a microwave oven requires a very careful and safety conscious approach. SOS Accessoire cannot be held responsible for any accidents that may occur.

There is an issue with the electricity supply to the appliance

There is an issue with the electricity supply to the appliance Your microwave may be tripping the power due to an issue with its electricity supply. We recommend taking a look at the socket to see whether it might have melted. If you can't unplug your microwave, the socket and plug may have fused together, in which case you'll need to turn of the electricity supply and try applying a little force to get them to come apart. Call in an electrician if necessary.

The turntable motor is wet

The turntable motor is wet The turntable motor enables your microwave to cook food uniformly. It's possible that when you put your food in the microwave, liquid of some kind ran under the turntable and you then forgot to clean it up. This liquid could have ended up finding its way to the motor, causing it to leak electricity and trip the circuit breaker. You can check the motor using a multimeter in ohmmeter mode. Begin by disconnecting the microwave from the electricity supply and discharging the capacitor. Then locate the turntable motor, which will be underneath the appliance. Next, disconnect all the connectors and place the multimeter's two probes (in ohmmeter mode) on the motor's terminals to test for continuity (it should normally give a reading of between 6 and 11 kilo ohms).
You can also check whether the motor is leaking electricity or not by placing one of the multimeter's probes (still in ohmmeter mode) on the appliance's metal chassis and the other on one of the motor's terminals. If you get a continuity reading (a value is displayed), this means the motor is faulty.
Make absolutely sure you carefully follow the safety instructions provided at the beginning of this troubleshooting guide.

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The interference suppressor has blown

The interference suppressor has blown The interference suppressor is needed to protect the appliance from possible electronic malfunctions. It will normally be fitted just after the point where the power lead enters. Interference suppressors can sometimes blow, causing them to short-circuit and trip the power or blow the fuses.

The door safety latch is broken

The door safety latch is broken The door safety latch mechanism on your microwave contains several small switches. If any of the door latch hooks is broken or any of the switches is faulty, the appliance will not operate. This could also cause the microwave's fuse to blow or trip your circuit. You can test the door latch using a multimeter in ohmmeter mode, first with the door in its open position and then with it closed. Open up your microwave's outer casing and locate the door latch microswitches. Disconnect all the electrical connectors and place the multimeter's two probes on the microswitches' terminals. You should get a value in one of the two positions of each switch (i.e. door open or door closed).Make absolutely sure you remember to follow the safety instructions provided at the beginning of this article.
Make absolutely sure you remember to follow the safety instructions provided at the beginning of this article.

The magnetron has an electrical leak

The magnetron has an electrical leak The magnetron sits inside the microwave's outer casing. It is powered by the electrical current supplied to the appliance and emits electromagnetic waves. If it has an electrical leak, it will trip the circuit breaker. Important: do not forget to follow the safety instructions provided at the beginning of this troubleshooting guide. Before testing this component, check your multimeter is definitely set to "Ohms Ω" and make sure you've discharged the capacitor. To take the measurement, disconnect the magnetron's connectors and place the multimeter's probes on its terminals. If the value you obtain is around zero, the magnetron is working correctly and is not the source of the fault. To verify the result, also check to see if there is any current leaking anywhere. To do this, place the tip of one of the multimeter's probes on the outer metal casing of the magnetron and the other probe on one of its connection terminals. Repeat the operation for each terminal. If you do not obtain any values, this confirms there is no electrical leak. Never test these components without first disconnecting the appliance from the electricity supply and discharging the capacitor. There is a risk of getting electrocuted. Replace the magnetron if your tests prove it to be defective.

The capacitor is faulty

The capacitor is faulty The capacitor stores energy then releases it in an amplified state. If it's defective, the appliance will make a loud noise when operating and end up blowing its fuse or even tripping your electricity. Do not test the capacitor unless you've first disconnected it from the electricity supply and discharged it by short-circuiting it with an electrically insulated tool. Otherwise, you run the risk of getting electrocuted. Disconnect the connectors from the capacitor then place the tips of your multimeter's probes (in ohmmeter mode) on each of the capacitor's terminals. if you don't obtain a value, the capacitor is defective.
You can also check whether the capacitor has an electrical leak or not. To do this, place one of the multimeter's probes on one of the capacitor's terminals and the other probe on the appliance's metal frame/casing. Carry out this same test on each of the capacitor's terminals. You should not obtain any values. If you do, this component will need to be replaced.

The high voltage diode is short-circuiting

The high voltage diode is short-circuiting The high voltage diode is made up of a stack of eight diodes. Due to this stacking, the HV diode cannot be checked with a multimeter. One end of it connects to the capacitor and the other to your microwave's ground. If the HV diode is short-circuiting or leaking electricity, your appliance may make a loud noise and could end up blowing the fuse or tripping the circuit. Replacing the HV diode is normally not difficult, and they are quite cheap to purchase. However, make sure you follow the safety instructions detailed above if you decide to do this.

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The transformer is faulty

The transformer is faulty The high voltage transformer amplifies the electric current so that the magnetron can operate. One end of the transformer connects directly to the appliance's ground. If the transformer is defective, the appliance will make a lot of noise and could trip the circuit or blow a fuse. If this happens, your microwave will not be able operate. Before checking and testing this component, carefully read the safety instructions provided at the beginning of this article. You risk electrocuting yourself if you neglect to do this.

The timer is jammed

The timer is jammed Your microwave's timer will be either mechanical or electronic in design. If any of the timer's electrical contacts are damaged, this could cause the circuit to trip or a fuse to blow. You can check the condition of this component, but ensure you pay strict attention to the safety instructions when doing so.

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